Music Marketing – The Essentials of an Effective Music Press Kit

As a struggling independent musician in a very competitive and crowded market, don’t say you need to stand out from the crowd. There are several ways to do this. There are music promotions, radio promotion, extended touring presence and almighty music marketing and promotion. You have to spread your message – point.

Delivering your music marketing message is one thing, and delivering the right message is another. Your professional image as a freelance artist is of paramount importance to rise above the sea of competition. Most independent groups and independent artists have some music press kits or promotional materials that they use for advertising purposes. Musicians typically use traditional print music media kits, digital press kits (DPK) or online EPK (electronic press whales). But how professional and convincing are they?

My independent artists and musicians often ask me the question: what kind of press kit should we assemble? What type of music press whale works best, is the most impressive and effective? The answer to this question depends on a few things.

I mean, I recommend creating and maintaining two types of press kits: a print kit or a digital music press kit and an electronic media kit. The reason is simple. Certain media, labels, venues, music companies, etc. Prefer a printed press kit or a digital press kit with a full CD so that it can also be listened to on high-performance stereophonic equipment to get the full effect of your music and product quality. Others prefer that their tables are not cluttered with piles of press picks, and their preferred method is simply to watch your music online.

For just-mentioned reasons, we recommend that you create a print or digital press kit and post it online. In fact there is nothing to do EPK online, so why not make it available? There are some great EPK services that cost just a few dollars a month.

For just-mentioned reasons, we recommend that you create a print or digital press kit and post it online. In fact there is nothing to do EPK online, so why not make it available? There are some great EPK services that cost just a few dollars a month. But I emphasize that an EPC (electronic online press whale) is not enough. You should always have in your arsenal of musical promotion a traditional paper or digital clipboard.

It should be noted that your music press kit is probably your most valuable advertising tool and should be taken very seriously. Along with your CD and live performance, this is usually the first impression of you as an artist who gets labels, scenes and other music media. There are many printing companies that specialize in producing advertising materials for the media and you can consider them if your budget allows. Otherwise you can do it yourself for a few dollars, a little creativity and a bit of time and effort. Here are the basics of a printed press whale and an electronic press whale, as well as professional ways to do so.

In your version of the traditional printed music press kit you need to include a professionally designed cover with your logo or photo, a cover letter, a biography of a group or performer, a professional glossy promotional photo in black and white 8×10, an article in the media. press releases, album reviews and quotes, your full or professionally recorded demo CD, an industrial CD on one sheet, a business card and a professionally labeled envelope. Necessary materials: dense paper, portfolio cover, large envelope, address stickers, business cards and glossy 8×10 photo. Here’s how to assemble a printed press whale.

LIGHTING AND INTRODUCTION:
Your professional music press kit should have impressive lighting. This should include a photograph of the artist, the artist’s name and the artist’s contact details. Kind of like a book cover. Also attach a cover letter. You have to present it as an artist who briefly says something about you. Don’t be too specific in this letter, you can leave it for the biography and other materials that you are going to record.

LIGHTING AND INTRODUCTION:
Your professional music press kit should have impressive lighting. This should include a photograph of the artist, the artist’s name and the artist’s contact details. Kind of like a book cover. Also attach a cover letter. You have to present it as an artist who briefly says something about you. Don’t be too specific in this letter, you can leave it for the biography and other materials that you are going to record.

Be sure to address the letter to a specific person – it is important to be personal. It doesn’t look like a cookie cutter, and you feel that this carrier, this label, the place or this music agent makes sense. Be sure to provide your full contact details or contact information with your artist’s representative at the top or bottom of this letter. The cover letter should be placed inside the set cover before any other information. Contact details should also be listed in the bottom right corner of each Music Promotion Kit page.

Biography of an artist or group:
The next page, or what will actually be the first information page of the music media whale, will be the page of your artist’s biography. Here you should include a brief history of the performer or band, a little about each member if it is a complete group. It doesn’t have to be longer than one page, and it doesn’t have to be a long group story, just a summary of what you’ve achieved and what you want to achieve. Most importantly, you should include things like big shows or tours, won contests, radio performances or other achievements that you think deserve to be mentioned and can lift you above others in popularity and development. Make it simple, concise and informative. If you or your friends do not have a writer, we strongly recommend that your group’s biography be written by a professional music writer. It’s so important and it has to be professional.

Media and Press:
The following pages of your music promotional package should be dedicated to the media and the press. In fact, these are important excerpts from one of the thematic articles you’ve received in magazines or newspapers about the music industry. Don’t go too far.

Related Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *